Feminists suddenly angry about ‘Football 101 for Women’ class that has been offered since mid-90s

Campus Reform Reporter

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  • "Football 101 for Women" has been offered since the mid-1990s at University of Colorado.
  • Athletic department spokesman Dave Plati says he hasn't received a single complaint about the class in the nearly 20 years.
  • The class covers more advanced elements of the game, such as the advantages of a "cover 2" defense.
  • A group of University of Colorado (CU) alumni are upset about a “Football 101 for Women Class”—despite the fact that it has been popular since the mid-1990s.

    Several people have demanded that the class either be cancelled or opened up to both genders, according to The Daily Camera, a local news source.

    The class will cover more advanced topics such as the advantages of a “cover 2” defense.   

    "It makes me embarrassed that the university would think this is a good idea," 1996 graduate CU Sarah McLaughlin told the Camera.

    "It seems very medieval or backwards. Very archaic in how they think about women's understandings of sports," she continued.

    However, CU athletic department spokesman Dave Plati said he has not heard a single complaint in the nearly 20 years it has been offered.

    The three-hour class is an "interactive clinic” which includes “meetings, film study and skill stations taught by (coach Mike) MacIntyre and the rest of the CU football coaches," according to an emailed newsletter called “Buffs Blast.”

    Like Plati, MacIntyre said he has gotten positive feedback from past attendees.

    "The ladies really enjoyed it, it gives them more knowledge of the game," he said in the newsletter.

    According to Plati, the class is not condescending to women because it covers the more complex aspects of the game.

    "You won't hear about the very basics of the game, such as a touchdown is worth six points," he told the Camera, and the class will cover more advanced topics such as the advantages of a “cover 2” defense.

    Many other schools have offered similar classes, such as the University of Tulsa, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Connecticut and University of Notre Dame.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter @kctimpf