Chris Rock won't play colleges because they're too politically correct

Maggie Lit
Former Reporter

  • Rock says the students are overly sensitive and protest qualified speakers such as civil rights activists, noted progressives, and staffers from Huffington Post.
  • Comedian and actor Chris Rock has decided he is going to stop playing college campuses because they are “way too conservative.”

    Rock doesn’t mean the students are conservative in their political views, as he told New York Magazine, but he feels students are too sensitive and are unable to take jokes.

    "You can’t even be offensive on your way to being inoffensive."   

    “Not in their political views—not like they’re voting Republican—but in their social views and their willingness not to offend anybody,” said Rock. “Kids raised on a culture of ‘We’re not going to keep score in the game because we don’t want anybody to lose.’ Or just ignoring race to a fault. You can’t say ‘the black kid over there.’ No, it’s ‘the guy with the red shoes.’ You can’t even be offensive on your way to being inoffensive.”

    Rock said that such sensitivity can be seen when students protest every time they don’t like a featured speaker, pointing to demonstrations against civil liberty activists, noted progressives, and staffers from the Huffington Post.

    Rock made no mention of conservative speakers who have faced backlash from students and had their visits cancels such as Condoleezza Rice at Rutgers College and George Will at Scripps College.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @MaggieLitCRO





    Maggie Lit

    Maggie Lit

    Former Reporter
    Maggie was a reporter with Campus Reform. Before joining the Campus Reform team, Maggie wrote for The Daily Caller and Radio America. During her time in college, Maggie spent her summers producing content for politically conservative news outlets including The Daily Caller, Radio America, and CBS Denver. She is now a digital media producer at LifeZette.
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