App rewards students with food for staying off phone

Nicole Poole
Georgia Campus Correspondent

  • The app, named Pocket Points, enables professors to track how long a student’s phone has been locked. For every twenty minutes a student’s phone is locked, they are awarded one point. Students can use their accumulated points for discounted food.
  • Got a case of the munchies during class? Stay off your phone and a few universities will reward your technological fasting with food.

    According to Onward State, an alternative blog at Penn State, colleges such as Pennsylvania State University and California State University are implementing a new app program that would reward students with food to encourage them to pay attention in class.

    The app, named Pocket Points, enables professors to track how long a student’s phone has been locked. For every twenty minutes a student’s phone is locked, they are awarded one point. Students can use their accumulated points for discounted food at participating shops both on and off campus.   

    The app, named Pocket Points, enables professors to track how long a student’s phone has been locked. For every twenty minutes a student’s phone is locked, they are awarded one point. Students can use their accumulated points for discounted food at participating shops both on and off campus.

    “Pocket Points addresses what has clearly become a problem in our university classrooms - the tendency of students to pay more attention to their phones and social media, rather than their classes,” Sam Ellis, a student from the University of Michigan, told Campus Reform.

    “However, students and universities that are considering implementing this app would do well to keep in mind that in the real world, there are no ‘points’ for keeping your head in the game and staying focused. Lastly, universities should keep in mind that at this time, there is no Pocket Points app available to Android users.”

    “The app is reportedly popular among lecturers and one that universities will definitely support. However, the criticisms on the app are that it could increase obesity rates and it won’t stop students who use laptops.” Katie Lismore wrote in Konbini.com.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @nikicole19





    Nicole Poole

    Nicole Poole

    Georgia Campus Correspondent

    As a Campus Correspondent, Nicole exposed liberal bias and abuses at Georgia colleges and universities. Since graduating, she is no longer a Campus Correspondent.

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