U of Tennessee to feature lesbian bondage expert as part of $20,000 sex week

Campus Reform Reporter
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The University of Tennessee is set to spend $20,000 of student funds on a “sex week” beginning April 7, which will feature a “Golden Condom Scavenger Hunt” and an “interactive workshop” from self-described “lesbian BDSM (Bondage, Discipline, Sadism, and Masochism) expert” Sinclair Sexsmith.

A flyer for the University of Tennessee's "sex week" that is set to include a lecture entitled "How Many Licks Does it Take…."

The Golden Condom Scavenger Hunt is described on the event’s official website as a campus-wide search for a golden condom.

“[T]he Sex Week Team will hide one golden condom on campus,” it reads. “Clever hints will be released daily. The retriever of this condom will win a prize!”

According to the event’s official website, the workshop, led by Sexsmith, will instruct participants on “how to turn up the heat on our own sex drive” and play with “butch/femme roles.”

Other events being hosted as a part of the week include two lectures given by sexologist Megan Andelloux that are named “Big Orange, Big…;)” and “How Many Licks Does it take….”

Sexsmith runs an online project known as the “Sugarbutch Chronicles: The Sex, Gender and Relationship Adventures of a Kinky Queer Butch Top.”  Her latest book is entitled Say Please: Lesbian BDSM Erotica.

The Sexual Empowerment and Awareness at Tennessee (SEAT) student group is hosting the Sex Week. One of the co-founders of SEAT, Jacob Clark, was recently in the news for proposing a bill for UT’s SGA that support gender-neutral housing at the university.

According to the week’s budget, the total cost is  estimated at $20,000  that will come from programs funded by fees students pay each semester.

Administrators at UT declined to provide comment on the week or say whether students under the age of 18 will be allowed to participate.

Nathan Foust, a senior at UT, told Campus Reform he believes the school should be spending money on events that are more valuable to students.

“I don’t see the real point in events like this as I think the only students who will attend will be the ones to go as a joke,” Foust commented.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @ScottMGreer