Prof tries to get conservatives fired over FB argument

Amber Athey
Investigative Reporter

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  • A Texas State University history professor called the employers of at least two conservatives, one a current student, to accuse them of "hate speech" in retribution over a political disagreement on Facebook.
  • A Texas State University history professor called the employers of at least two conservatives, one a current student, in retribution over a political disagreement on Facebook.

    Elizabeth Bishop, who is allegedly rumored to become the next dean of the College of Liberal Arts, made phone calls to employers and a university department in an attempt to punish the two conservatives for daring to disagree with her in a Facebook discussion.

    “Thankfully, my employer laughed the ordeal off after seeing that the allegations of hate speech were false.”   

    [RELATED: CSU employee shames students as ‘local racists’]

    The Facebook status in question was initially posted by Colton Duncan, the student body vice president, but was apparently later removed by Facebook for “violating community standards.”

    Duncan decried Texas State’s apparent double standard in allowing radical communist Angela Davis to speak on campus, calling her an “American terrorist,” but not allowing the College Republicans to hold a Women’s Empowerment Summit.

    The status soon developed into a debate over the relative merits of capitalism and communism, where Alexander Morrissette, an employee of the Texas Public Policy Foundation, and Bishop began commenting at each other.

    “It’s a shame we live in an era when university students can’t tell the difference between Stalin and Hitler,” Bishop wrote. “Like, they fought World War II. As enemies.”

    Morrissette responded, “Enemies can have similar goals, interests, and dreams of autocratic control.”

    Their debate continued in relatively the same vein, but things escalated when the Texas Public Policy Foundation received a call from Bishop the next day asking if Morrissette was one of its employees.

    Bishop contended in the call that Morrissette had made a disparaging Facebook post about her, but refused to provide details on what the post said. The employee who answered the call said she would talk to Morrissette about his Facebook habits, and Bishop hung up the phone shortly thereafter.

    Seemingly unsatisfied with the Foundation’s response, as Morrissette said they “laughed the ordeal off,” Bishop set her sights on an anonymous Texas State student who had “liked” several of Morrissette’s comments.

    Bishop allegedly called the university department where the student works and requested they investigate her and her “associates” for “hate speech,” and further demanded that the student be removed from her leadership positions on campus.

    When Morrissette heard of this development, he said it was “worse...that she levied her threats at students who are still directly subjected to her authority on campus.”

    [RELATED: CSUF lecturer allegedly assaults conservative student on campus]

    “Thankfully, my employer laughed the ordeal off after seeing that the allegations of hate speech were false,” Morrissette explained. “The employers on college campuses, especially campuses that are so rife with Politically Correct culture, may not be so judicious in their evaluation of these kinds of claims.”

    Duncan said he was shocked to hear of Bishop’s calls to employers over his Facebook status and asserted that he would be “deeply disappointed” if the rumors about Bishop becoming dean turn out to be true.

    “Someone like that, with little to no regard for the First Amendment, has no business educating the next generation of leaders,” Duncan stated. “The political science department has pumped out a good number of leaders, whether they're activists, public servants, or leaders in the private sector. I shudder at the thought of this woman wielding any authority over this process.”

    Duncan has received his fair share of criticism for the Facebook status, receiving a number of calls and emails that prompted him to hold an “un-official press conference.”

    Campus Reform reached out to Texas State University and Bishop for comment but did not receive a response by press time.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @amber_athey



    Amber Athey

    Amber Athey

    Investigative Reporter

    Amber Athey is an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. She graduated from Georgetown University with a B.A. in Government and Economics, and is currently a member of the 2016-2017 Koch Associate Program. 

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