Wash. U paper wants to know if students prefer 'face-sitting' or '69'

Anthony Gockowski
Investigative Reporter

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  • An anonymous “sex survey” asks students to divulge their sexual histories, favorite sex positions, and preferred sex toys.
  • An independent newspaper known as Student Life at Washington University (WU) in St. Louis is encouraging students to take an anonymous “sex survey” that asks participants to divulge their sexual histories, favorite sex positions, and preferred sex toys.

    The prying, 50-question survey covers a variety of suggestive topics, and not only asks students about the frequency of their sexual encounters but also discusses many of the possible details and circumstances.

    At the beginning of the survey, students are asked to state their “favorite sexual position,” which could be “69,” “wheelbarrow,” “over a desk/table,” and “face-sitting.”

    “What kind of sex toy(s) do you own?” another question asks and then provides a list of possible responses, which includes sex toys such as “handcuffs,” “mitts,” “dildo,” “vibrator,” “a paddle,” “fleshlight/flashjack,” “inflatable sex doll,” “butt plug,” “cock ring,” and “anal beads.” Students also have the option of stating that they do not own any sex toys or skipping the question all together.

    The survey then asks students to explain how they use their sex toys and lists answers like “by myself exclusively,” “by myself and with a partner,” or “with some friends.”

    Survey questions then switch to the topic of sexual fantasies and desires, and participants are asked to name their favorite “sexual activities.” The possible responses are:

    · “Dominance/submission”

    · “Choking/breath control”

    · “Bondage”

    · “Anal play”

    · “Spanking”

    · “Voyeurism”

    · “Cross-Dressing”

    · “Role playing”

    · “Multiple partners”

    · “Exhibitionism”

    Voyeurism, one of the possible “sexual activities” students may engage in, is the practice of obtaining sexual gratification by secretly watching others engage in sexual acts. Exhibitionism, another possible answer, is the act of publicly displaying genitals. Both of these “sexual activities” are legally punishable under certain circumstances and can result in a fine or jail time.

    Another set of questions asks students about their sexual histories on campus, including questions about who they have had sex with and in what campus buildings.

    “With which of the following have you had a sexual encounter?” one question asks, with answers such as:

    · “Your RA”

    · “Your TA”

    · “A professor whose class you were taking”

    · “A local high school student”

    The survey then asks students to indicate where their sexual encounters have taken place. Some possible answers include:

    · “Olin Library – stacks”

    · “The orchestra pit on Brookings Quad”

    · “Any elevators on campus”

    · “The roof of any building”

    The survey also discusses the 2016 election with questions about the sexual appeal of presidential hopefuls. “Which presidential candidate would you have sex with?” one question asks, followed by a list of presidential candidates.

    Campus Reform reached out to Student Life to ask which candidate was the least sexually appealing to WU students but Editor-in-Chief Megan Magray said the data is not released to outside parties.

    Student Life, according to their website, receives over 150,000 page views each month and is staffed by over 50 undergraduate student reporters and editors.

    Campus Reform asked Student Life General Manager Ray Bush, via email, if the newspaper is funded by the university.

    “Why do you ask?” Bush replied.

    After Campus Reform explained the purpose of the question, Bush replied a second time.

    “We’re the independent newspaper at Washington University in St. Louis since 1878,” Bush said.

    Campus Reform explained that his reply did not answer the initial question and asked Bush to address the question directly.

    “All college newspapers receive funding per se from their universities, most commonly in the way of purchased advertising from departments and clubs,” Bush said in response.”Why does our business model, in any way, pertain to your story?”

    According to the publication’s LinkedIn page, the university purchases a bulk subscription for each undergraduate student.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @AGockowski



    Anthony Gockowski

    Anthony Gockowski

    Investigative Reporter

    Anthony Gockowski is an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. He has previously worked for The Daily Caller, Intercollegiate Review, and The Catholic Spirit.

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