UW-Green Bay offers profs $2K to 'diversify their courses'

Anthony Gockowski
Investigative Reporter

  • The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering up to 10 faculty members a $2,000 stipend each to “create an inclusive classroom environment” and “diversify their courses.”
  • Successful applicants are expected to "infuse inclusive materials into one of their classes, use diverse teaching methods, create an inclusive classroom environment, and learn more about implicit biases and stereotyping.”
  • The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is offering up to 10 faculty members a $2,000 stipend each to “create an inclusive classroom environment” and “diversify their courses.”

    According to a Wednesday announcement on the matter, the “Inclusivity Fellows Program” is seeking 10 candidates, either faculty members or instructors, to “infuse inclusive materials into one of their classes, use diverse teaching methods, create an inclusive classroom environment” and simply “learn more about implicit biases and stereotyping.”

    "This is an opportunity for faculty and instructors to become more culturally competent teachers."   

    [RELATED: Bates faculty create guidelines for ‘inclusive’ classrooms]

    For doing so, each Fellow will receive a $2,000 stipend, meaning the Inclusivity Fellows Program could ultimately set the school back by as much as $20,000.

    Wednesday’s call for applicants describes the fellows program as “an opportunity for faculty and instructors to become more culturally competent teachers by providing them time and resources from the one-time funds to diversify their courses.”

    Applicants are expected to submit a 400-word statement specifically outlining which course they “would like to revise” to be more inclusive while explaining what they “hope to achieve” with their revised course.

    [RELATED: UCLA pays profs $1000 a piece to teach anti-Trump workshops]

    Apart from revising one of their courses, recipients of the fellowship will be expected to meet monthly with Pride Center Coordinator Stacie Christian and Professor Kate Burns, the latter of whom is responsible for accepting applications from instructors.

    In just 400 words or fewer, prospective Fellows are asked to identify a specific course that they would like to revise, and also explain what they hope to achieve with the alterations.

    Campus Reform reached out to Burns for comment on the fellowship, but did not receive a response in time for publication.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @AGockowski





    Anthony Gockowski

    Anthony Gockowski

    Investigative Reporter

    Anthony Gockowski is an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. He has previously worked for The Daily Caller, Intercollegiate Review, and The Catholic Spirit.

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