Campus Reform | Yale sociology prof says Christian homeschooling is 'vector of white Christian nationalism'

Yale sociology prof says Christian homeschooling is 'vector of white Christian nationalism'

A Yale University professor said that Christian homeschooling is often “a major vector of White Christian Nationalism.”

He said that Christian nationalism is “a cultural framework that idealizes and advocates a fusion of Christianity with American civic life.”

A Yale University professor claimed that Christian homeschooling is often “a major vector of White Christian Nationalism.”

Philip Gorski — who teaches sociology — wrote the critique on Twitter after retweeting an advertisement for a Christian school from 1975.

The advertisement emphasized that the school had “no hippies,” as children were expected to maintain “neatness of appearance, proper length of hair for boys, and right attitudes toward elders.” Students were also taught about the “sacredness of hard work.”

The school also boasted that students were “taught to love America” and that patriotism is “a part of our program.”

[RELATED: LGBTQ+ students sue Dept of Ed to defund their own Christian universities]

Later, Gorski issued a more comprehensive explanation of Christian homeschooling as a vector for nationalism.


Caveating that “Not all homeschoolers are Christians” and “not all Christian homeschoolers learn Christian Nationalism,” Gorski shared a graphic stating that Christian nationalism is “a cultural framework that idealizes and advocates a fusion of Christianity with American civic life.”

“It carries with it assumptions about nativism, white supremacy, authoritarianism, patriarchy, and militarism,” added the graphic, which condemned purported adherents for believing that “racial inequality is due to the personal shortcomings of minority groups” and opposing “science education in schools.”

Gorski shared two articles from Christianity Today — one of whom argued that parents should “root out the nationalist weed” in their children’s Christian education.



“There is undoubtedly an overlap between Christian Nationalists and Christian homeschoolers,” concluded Gorski. “How big is it? And where is it? This we don't really know because the the numbers off homeschoolers picked up bu (sic) surveys are too small to allow for statistically reliable conclusions.”

Gorski told Campus Reform that he does not have any specific policy proposals to address nationalism in Christian homeschooling, as he assumes that it would be “protected as a form of religious freedom.”


Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BenZeisloft