Campus Reform | EXCLUSIVE: That seminar about right-handed privilege cost $4,000

EXCLUSIVE: That seminar about right-handed privilege cost $4,000

Christina Parle's talk, which included an overview of discrimination faced by left-handed people, went viral earlier this year.

Campus Reform obtained a copy of Parle's contract, which stipulates the $4,000 fee.

Administrators had Greek life participants at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill to sit through an intersectionality seminar, which touched on a wide range of intersectionality-related issues — including the notion that right-handed people have a special degree of “privilege.”

Campus Reform obtained a copy of the contract for the event, which shows that the speaker, Christina Parle of Social Responsibility Speaks, earned $4,000 for her talk on right-handed "privilege." 

"The event was funded by a fraternity and sorority membership fee for programming and events," a UNC spokesperson told Campus Reform. 

UNC’s Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life required members of fraternities and sororities to send representatives to a talk about diversity, equity, and inclusion, according to an email obtained by Carolina Review, which the university subsequently confirmed to Campus Reform.  

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An Oct. 18 image from the seminar of Parle decrying “right-handed privilege” soon went viral on social media, with Parle claiming that those who are right-handed have “easier” lives and “more opportunity.”

UNC Assistant Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life Cassie Hughes Thomas told Campus Reform that Parle’s session was one lecture among “an ongoing educational programming series based on eight dimensions of wellness, which range from financial skills to career building.” 

Parle’s lecture occurred during a meeting focused on “intellectual wellness.”

In audio leaked to Carolina Review, Parle also decries the “oppression” that occurs when shelves at grocery stores are too tall for short people.

“How many of you, when you go to the grocery store, need somebody to help you with the top shelf?” she asked. “That is a system of oppression… it means that every grocery store, literally almost across the nation, was built for the average height person.”

Parle also asked, “How many of you are aware that there are some people who have to purchase two flight tickets in order to fit in a seat?”

Later in the presentation, students were told to shout of their first impressions after seeing a series of images, such as a doctor in a hijab, an Asian child doing math, and an overweight child eating a burger. 

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Students yelled unrelated answers, triggering Parle’s ire: “So here’s the deal, some of you are saying it out loud because you think it’s funny but realistically, all of your brains are doing things that are probably a lot more shitty [sic] than burgers and toys.”

Parle, who asks on her Instagram page to be called by “She/They” pronouns, serves as the Director of Chapter Services and Conduct for Zeta Beta Tau fraternity.

Campus Reform reached out to Parle, the UNC Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life for comment; this article will be updated accordingly.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BenZeisloft