WATCH: Students disaffected with Biden ahead of the State of the Union

George Washington University students told Campus Reform Reporter Alexa Schwerha that Biden needs to do more on Ukraine and inflation.


President Biden is scheduled to deliver his first official State of the Union address to the nation on Tuesday, March 1, at 9:00 PM ET from the United States Capitol. 

Throughout the first year of his term, the President has confronted a number of issues facing everyday Americans including raising inflation, an immigration crisis, and the handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to a Feb. 27 ABC News and the Washington Post poll, President Biden's approval rating has slumped to 37% just ahead of today's national address.

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When asked by Campus Reform Reporter Alexa Schwerha what the President can say in his speech to increase support among voters, George Washington University students were clear. 

Biden needs to do more.

"A lot of Americans are frustrated that a lot of the promises that were made during the election haven't been made yet," one student commented. "People were expecting things to move a little faster than they are."

Lack of confidence in the current Commander-in-Chief was also on display.

"People just aren't really confident in him. When all the Russia stuff first started, Biden spoke for about ten minutes, and I think there's a lot to be said," another student stated.

[RELATED: WATCH: 'He's Failed': Students Disown Joe Biden After Endless 'Disaster']

One student expressed her concerns with Biden's handling of the escalating situation in Ukraine, noting that Biden has "done a lot of tough talk, but we haven't really seen tough action."

Finally, when asked if Americans were better off today than one year ago, students delivered mixed responses.

While students largely agreed that COVID-19 is easing, the lingering effects of the pandemic are still a concern. Examples cited by respondents included a suffering economy and foreign policy handling, such as Afghanistan. 

"Would I say we are in a much better place? Not so much," one student admitted.

Watch the full video above.

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