UPDATE: Princeton hires director to enforce 'supplier diversity' quota

Princeton University recently hired an 'Associate Director for Supplier Diversity' in charge of overseeing the Ivy League institution's commitment to making more its supplier base minority-owned.

Princeton’s diversity and equity initiatives have often found themselves at the center of national attention.

Princeton University recently hired an "Associate Director for Supplier Diversity" in charge of overseeing the Ivy League institution's commitment to making more its supplier base minority-owned. 

In May 2021, Campus Reform reported that Princeton pledged in its Supplier Diversity Multi-Year Plan that the university "will try to "include more businesses that are at least 51% owned and operated by people of color, women, veterans or members of the LGBTQ+ community.” 

Earlier this month, the university announced that Michelle Thomas will fill the associate director position. 

[RELATED: Princeton students call out dean’s Rittenhouse email for ‘factual inaccuracies, misconstrual, and virtue signaling’]

Princeton has also launched a partnership with the New Jersey Educational Facilities Authority (EFA) that will "expand opportunities for colleges and universities to invest with diverse asset managers," per the same announcement. 

Likewise, Princeton’s Office of Facilities “convened an action forum of peer institutions, architects, construction leaders and others to explore collaborative strategies for enhancing the pipeline of minority-owned firms in the construction trades.”

Princeton’s diversity and equity initiatives have often found themselves at the center of national attention.

[RELATED: Princeton should 'budget some free time for us,' Ivy League student argues]

For example, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber wrote in September 2020 that “racist assumptions from the past” remain “embedded” in the structures of the university, the Trump administration’s Department of Education argued that since the university receives tens of millions of taxpayer dollars, the school would be in violation of federal law if it discriminated according to race, color, or national origin.

In 2021, Princeton cited “systemic racism” as a reason for no longer requiring classics majors to learn Latin or Greek. 

The school claimed that “the changes ultimately give students more opportunities to major in classics.”

Campus Reform reached out to Princeton University for comment; this article will be updated accordingly.