UCLA Law creates database to track efforts to restrict the teaching of critical race theory

UCLA Law has developed a database to monitor 'activity that attempts to restrict access to truthful information about Critical Race Theory (CRT).'

Funded by UCLA Law and a $400,000 grant from Lumina Foundation’s Racial and Equity Fund, the project is the first of its kind.

The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Law has developed a database to monitor “activity that attempts to restrict access to truthful information about Critical Race Theory (CRT)” by local, state, and federal governments.

Launched on August 2, the database is part of UCLA Law’s CRT Forward Tracking Project, and examines “legislative, regulatory and administrative efforts to block or undermine the teaching of a more complete history of the United States in schools across the country,” according to a university press release.

Funded by UCLA Law and a $400,000 grant from Lumina Foundation’s Racial and Equity Fund, the project is the first of its kind. 

[RELATED: 'Critical Race Theory' course taught at University of Iowa one year after governor's ban]

The archive will catalog anti-CRT measures that allegedly “limit truth telling” in regard to the ideology. More than 500 instances of “anti-CRT activity” have already been flagged. 

Statements the Tracking Project implies schools should be permitted to teach include “The U.S. is fundamentally racist or sexist,” “Meritocracy or traits such as a hard work ethic are racist or sexist or were created by a particular race to oppress another race,” and “An individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, bears responsibility for actions committed in the past by other members of the same race or sex.”

[RELATED: Professor calls parents ‘ignorant racist[s]’ for opposing Critical Race Theory]

The Project also has a “Resources” page for site visitors to learn more about CRT. 

Resources linked include UCLA’s Critical Race Studies program, the African American Policy Forum’s “#TruthBeTold Campaign,” an article by pioneering CRT scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw titled “This Is Not A Drill: The War Against Antiracist Teaching in America,” and an NAACP FAQ about CRT.

Campus Reform reached out to UCLA’s Law school and Taifha Alexander, the CRT Forward Tracking Project Director, for comment. This article will be updated accordingly.


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