Sororities stand up for female spaces during rush

Grant Sikes, a male student at the University of Alabama who self-identifies as 'non-binary,' recently went through UA’s sorority rush. In the end, however, no sorority invited him to join.

According to official UA sorority regulations, students are eligible to try to join a sorority as long as they 'consistently live and self-identify as women.'


Grant Sikes, a male student at the University of Alabama (UA) who self-identifies as “non-binary,” recently went through UA’s sorority rush. In the end, however, no sorority invited him to join.

Panhellenic organizations play a large role at UA, with 35% of students involved in Greek life, and 68 Greek organizations. There are 24 sororities that Sikes had the potential of joining. 

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According to official UA sorority regulations, students are eligible to try to join a sorority as long as they “consistently live and self-identify as women.”

During the rush, Sikes would post “Outfit of the Day” videos on his TikTok account, grabbing a large number of likes and views. 

Last week, Sikes was denied a bid and cut from the rest of the process by every sorority.

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This is not the first time a “gender non-conforming” person has attempted to rush a sorority. At Northwestern University in 2017, a man identifying as a woman tried to complete the rush process. 

According to the Chicago Tribune, Adam Davies, a transgender male, tried to get a bid to a sorority but was denied. Davies stated “The vibe was — as far as I could tell — we would love to have you, but we can't.” 

Campus Reform contacted the University of Alabama and Grant Sikes for comment. This article will be updated accordingly.