Article argues for ways to get around potential affirmative action bans in anticipation of SCOTUS rulings

A recent Chronicle of Higher Education article suggests ten ways universities might still make 'race-conscious' admissions decisions even if SCOTUS should undermine affirmative action.

In October of 2022, Campus Reform reported on a poll that found that a majority of Americans oppose affirmative action policies in higher education.

A recent Chronicle of Higher Education article suggests ten ways universities might still make "race-conscious" admissions decisions even if SCOTUS should undermine affirmative action in upcoming rulings.

Penned by writers Richard Kahlenberg and John C. Brittain, the first suggestion of the piece is to "Jettison legacy preferences." According to Kahlenberg and Brittain, children of college alumni are already “disproportionately white and wealthy” and legacy should no longer be taken into admission consideration. 

[RELATED: Supreme Court sets date for UNC, Harvard affirmative action cases]

The second and related suggestion is to "End preferences for faculty children."

Other suggestions include "Eliminate early admissions," "Give a significant boost in admissions to low-income and first-generation students," "Give a further boost to students who grew up in disadvantaged neighborhoods," and "Seek geographic diversity."

Kahlenberg and Brittain go on to argue that “[i]f college leaders fail to come up with good alternative paths to diversity, they will be guilty of betraying Black and Hispanic Americans.” 

Juan Echeverry, a senior at the University of South Florida, told Campus Reform that “as someone who is Hispanic I want the labor force and educational institutions to focus on who is more accomplished and what is more efficient rather than what my race is.”

[RELATED: PROF. ELLWANGER: The End of Affirmative Action on Campus? Don’t Bet on It.]

In October of 2022, Campus Reform reported on a poll that found that a majority of Americans oppose affirmative action policies in higher education. Of the polled voters that opposed affirmative action, 44% "strongly disapprove" and 16% "somewhat disapprove" of the practice.

The Chronicle of Higher Education has not responded to comments requested by Campus Reform.