Vermont offers in-state tuition to vets

Letty Burgin
Florida Campus Correspondent

  • The new policy took effect on July 1.
  • Vermont has joined more than thirty other states that give vets in-state tuition at public colleges.
  • Veterans from around the country will now be able to receive in-state tuition at colleges and universities across the state of Vermont.

    The new policy took effect July 1st and will allow Veterans and active service members who are eligible for G.I. Bill benefits to receive in-state tuition without having to wait until they have lived in the state for a full twelve months..

    "This benefit will open the door to a college degree or a certificate for these students who deserve all of our thanks and support."   

    “We are indebted to our nation’s veterans and are pleased to offer in-state tuition rates to all who come to the Vermont State Colleges to further their education,” said Jeb Spaulding, the chancellor of the Vermont colleges.

    Accord to Spaulding there is a massive difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition rates. Students who receive “Vermont Resident” status at the University of Vermont pay over twenty-two thousand dollars less than students who come from out of state.

    “I am proud that Vermont’s public institutions of higher education are stepping forward to offer this important tuition benefit for veterans and military-connected students,” said Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin (D). “This benefit will open the door to a college degree or a certificate for these students who deserve all of our thanks and support.”

    However, Vermont is not the only state that has made strides toward making the higher education process easier for Veterans. As previously reported by Campus Reform, Michigan Governor Richard “Rick” Snyder (R) signed legislation earlier this year that would make it easier for Veterans and active servicemembers to receive credits for similar courses they have already taken during their time in the military.

    In a statement provided to Campus Reform Gov. Snyder stated that “[t]his new law will help ensure that credit is granted for that knowledge, allowing servicemembers to receive their degree in a shorter period of time so they can embark on their new career.”

    The change in policy will add the state of Vermont to the growing list of over thirty states that have made their university systems compliant with the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014, which “requires public colleges to provide in-state tuition to veterans and eligible dependents” in order for schools to be eligible to receive G.I. Bill education funding.

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    Letty Burgin

    Letty Burgin

    Florida Campus Correspondent

    As a Campus Correspondent, Letty reveals liberal bias on university campuses across the state of Florida. Letty is a student at Florida State University and is earning her B.A. in Political Science. 

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