Mizzou 'Inclusive Terminology' guide calls 'Oriental,' 'urban' offensive terms

Bethany Salgado
Texas Campus Correspondent

Total Shares

  • In an effort to increase discussion about diversity and inclusion, the University of Missouri compiled a language guide to help students avoid stereotypes.
  • In addition to advising against using the terms "Oriental" and "Indian," the guide also warns that "ethnic" and "urban" have negative undertones.
  • UPDATE: Rajan Zed, President of the Universal Society of Hinduism, issued a statement condemning Mizzou for omitting Hindu terms from the guide, and demanded a formal apology.
  • In an effort to increase discussion about diversity and inclusion, the University of Missouri compiled a language guide to help students avoid stereotypes.

    The Inclusive Terminology guide, available on the Mizzou Diversity website, claims that terms such as Oriental, Ethnic, and Indian are all offensive.

    "Sticks and stones are not the only things that may be hurtful."   

    "Sticks and stones are not the only things that may be hurtful," the page informs students. "Words can significantly impact our interaction with others. Regardless of our motive and intentions, they may harm or enhance dialogue."

    The guide breaks down its terminology by categories such as ability; faith and religion; gender and sexuality; race, ethnicity, and national origin; socioeconomic status; safety issues; and other related areas. The words in each category were chosen as the most current relevant terms for Mizzou’s diversity initiative.

    The faith and religion section of the guide, for example, specifically defines terms related to Islam and Judaism, but fails to delve into other prominent world religions such as Christianity, Buddhism, or Hinduism.

    The portion of the guide outlining race claims that, “Oriental is considered offensive and should not be used as a synonym [for Asian],” though no mention is made of whether “Occidental” is equally offensive to individuals of European extraction.

    The same is written about using the word “Indian” to refer to a Native American, in place of which Mizzou prefers “American Indian, First Nation, or Indigenous person.”

    In addition, the university argues that the terms “ethnic” and “urban” contain negative undertones and should not be used in favor of “person of color.”

    Mizzou follows in the footsteps of the University of New Hampshire (UNH), whose Bias-Free Language Guide came under national criticism last summer for calling the word “American” problematic. After Campus Reform reported on the guide, it was quickly removed from UNH’s website.

    UPDATE: Rajan Zed, President of the Universal Society of Hinduism, released a statement Tuesday criticizing Mizzou for leaving Hindu terms out of its inclusive language guide, complaining that the omission represents a disservice to the world's third-largest religion and its roughly three million adherents in the U.S. Zed calls on Mizzou administrators to issue an apology and create an "honestly inclusive" terminology guide.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BethanySalgado



    Bethany Salgado

    Bethany Salgado

    Texas Campus Correspondent

    Bethany Salgado is a Texas Campus Correspondent, and reports liberal bias and abuse on campus for Campus Reform. Bethany is a senior at the University of Texas at Dallas, where she studies International Political Economy and Spanish. She previously worked on the Mitt Romney presidential campaign and interned with the Leadership Institute. She contributes toYoung Conservatives and 1776 Scholars Blog.

    More By Bethany Salgado

    Latest 20 Articles