Campus Reform | Pitt med students add vow against ‘systemic racism’ to Hippocratic Oath

Pitt med students add vow against ‘systemic racism’ to Hippocratic Oath

Students at the University of Pittsburgh’s medical school wrote their own Hippocratic Oath.

The class of 2024’s oath includes vows against “systemic racism” and LGBTQ+ discrimination.

Students at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine started a tradition of writing a class oath, to be recited alongside the traditional Hippocratic Oath.

The Hippocratic Oath is a vow to medical best practices that was affirmed by ancient Greek physicians. Today, it is still a tradition to say a version of the Hippocratic Oath at many medical school graduations as a standard of ethical conduct.


In the days before its Aug. 16 white coat ceremony, the class of 2024 presented its new oath to Pitt Medicine administrators. The oath included references to George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, as well as the COVID-19 pandemic, “systemic racism,” and LGBTQ+ identity.


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Specifically, the oath says that students will be allies to “those of low socioeconomic status, the BIPOC community, the LGBTQIA+ community, womxn/women, differently-abled individuals and other underserved groups in order to dismantle the systemic racism and prejudice that medical professionals and society have perpetuated.”


One Pitt freshman, who wishes to remain anonymous, told Campus Reform “I don't care what they believe, but scientifically there are two genders."


University of Pittsburgh spokesman Kevin Zwick told Campus Reform that the oath writing process was a “student driven effort,” and that no student is required to participate.


The full text of the oath says the following:

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A modern version of the Hippocratic Oath, written in 1964 by a former Tufts University School of Medicine dean and used in many medical schools today, says the following: 


Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BenZeisloft