Conservative students 'can't be comfortable' in class with instructor who accused GOP of wanting 'ethnic cleansing' (VIDEO)

  • UT-Austin student and Campus Reform Correspondent Lily Bonin say conservatives "can't be comfortable" in instructor Alex Wild's class.
  • Wild recently tweeted that Republicans want "ethnic cleansing" in the wake of the Trump administration announcing a new immigration rule.

Campus Reform Texas Correspondent Lily Bonin says conservative students "can't be comfortable" in one University of Texas-Austin instructor's class after he tweeted that Republicans want an "ethnic cleansing." 

Bonin appeared on Fox News' The Ingraham Angle Tuesday night and called the charge "a pretty heavy accusation to levy at a large portion of the population as well as probably some of his own students."

"that can't be comfortable to be a conservative in that class"   

Campus Reform first reported this story on Aug. 14 after UT-Austin curator of Entomology Alex Wild, who the university confirmed is also scheduled to teach at least one course during the fall 2019 semester, tweeted "shortly after Trump took office, I noted that Republicans were preparing an ethnic cleansing. Now, in 2019, I stand by that statement. Their thin, panicky public denials stand in stark contrast to their public messaging. And to the growing body count."

[RELATED: UT-Austin instructor doubles down on claim that Republicans want 'ethnic cleansing']

Bonin reacted to Wild's statement by saying that conservative students taking his class "can't be comfortable" in that environment.

"There are students probably in his class and that can't be comfortable to be a conservative in that class, knowing that your professor thinks you as a Republican are a nazi," Bonin said. 

"That's not going to be a productive learning environment and that's not going to encourage any sort of free exchange with your professor." 

 

Wild has not responded to Campus Reform's request for comment. A spokesperson for UT-Austin responded to Wild's tweets, saying, "the university follows federal and state law on issues related to Freedom of Speech and is committed to the principles of free inquiry. As such, members of the University community have the right to hold, vigorously defend, and express their personal ideas and opinions." 

Wild's statement came just weeks after one UT-Austin student group threatened to dox, or release the personal contact information of, incoming conservative freshman students who join conservative student organizations. Following that development, a UT-Austin spokesperson told Campus Reform that “students should never be targeted or face harassment for their affiliations, political beliefs or any other reason." 

[RELATED: Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro accused of 'doxing' Trump donors as UT-Austin deals with threats against conservative students]

"The anonymous group behind this doxxing is not affiliated with the university, is not a registered student group, and should not present itself in that way. As they did last fall, University Police are continuing to work to ensure the safety of any targeted students and monitor for any potential criminal actions," the university said in the statement. 

UT-Austin further stated that it had sent a letter to the office of the Texas attorney general asking for any possible "legal remedies" it could take. It's unclear whether the attorney general's office responded to that inquiry or whether the university has taken any further action. 

Freshman student orientation is scheduled to begin at UT-Austin on Wednesday. Campus Reform will be on the ground with the latest. 

SUBSCRIBE to Campus Reform's YouTube page to be alerted with the latest on-campus coverage. 

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @JonStreetDC and Twitter: @JonStreet



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Jon Street
Jon Street | Managing Editor

Jon Street is a news editor for Campus Reform. Six years ago, Jon cut his reporting teeth fresh out of college as an intern at Media Research Center's CNSNews.com, where he interviewed multiple members of Congress and former presidential candidates. From there, he went on to complete a stint at Watchdog.org, where his exclusive, investigative work was picked up or cited by the New York Times, Washington Post, Fox News, National Review, and the Drudge Report, among others. More recently, Jon spent three years as an assistant editor at TheBlaze.com. In his free time, Jon enjoys trying new coffeehouses around the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area and traveling back to his home state of Missouri to spend time with his family.

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