Colleges provide counseling, puppies for stressful V-Day

Amber Athey
Investigative Reporter

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  • Several colleges are offering counseling, puppy playtime, and guided meditation this Valentine’s Day in an effort to boost their students’ apparently low self-esteem.
  • Drew University, on the other hand, is hosting an "Anti-Valentine's Day" where students can hit a "beat the crap out of love" pinata and make a "DIY Cupid Repellent Perfume.
  • Image via Facebook: Georgia Tech Student Center

    Several colleges are offering counseling, puppy playtime, and guided meditation this Valentine’s Day in an effort to boost their students’ apparently low self-esteem.

    Georgia Tech, for example, held a self-care workshop where students could participate in guided meditation, do arts and crafts, make their own bath bombs, or simply eat chocolate to ease any distress they may be feeling over the holiday.

    “Just because your partner forgets to buy you a gift doesn’t mean that they don’t care about you.”   

    “This Valentine's Day, set time aside to take care of your greatest love - YOURSELF!” The Georgia Tech Student Center wrote in the event description. “Take some time for yourself on Valentine's Day to relax, dive within, and just be!”

    Towson University also offered opportunities to ward off any guilt associated with obsessive chocolate eating, hosting a “Love Your Body Valentines!” event where students could create “body positive” Valentine’s Day cards.

    “This year, be your own Valentine!” Towson declared. “Celebrate your body and send an empowering message to yourself.”

    [RELATED: ‘Love Your Body’ event promotes ‘comfort food,’ binge-watching]

    If bath bombs and Valentines cards weren’t enough, Cochise College invited students to “pet away your stress” at a "Puppy Love Valentine’s Day Party” featuring therapy dogs that stressed-out students could cavort with for three hours.

    None of the aforementioned events, however, presented the holiday as direly as Cabrini College’s guide to surviving Valentine’s Day, which offers tips for both single students and couples on how to survive the “significant disappointment” that comes with “high expectations.”

    Cabrini reminds single people that it is okay to feel lonely on Valentine’s Day because the holiday can often be a “painful reminder” of longing for a relationship or a past relationship that ended.

    “Talk to a supportive friend or write about the feelings this day stirs up,” Cabrini soothes. “Remind yourself that it is only one day and will pass.”

    [RELATED: Indiana students throw ‘condom fashion show’ for Valentine’s Day]

    Students in relationships, meanwhile, are reminded to communicate their expectations for the day to their partner, and to remember that Valentine’s Day will not fix problems already apparent in the relationship.

    “Just because your partner forgets to buy you a gift doesn’t mean that they don’t care about you,” Cabrini assures them. “Reflect on your partner’s actions over the duration of your relationship, not just on one day.”

    Drew University’s University Program Board, on the other hand, eschewed Valentine’s Day altogether, hosting an “Anti-Valentine’s Day” party and declaring “Happy Valentine’s Day to no one!!”

    [RELATED: MassArt helps children make valentines ‘To Islam, With Love’]

    “Join UPB for a homegrown event where you can make DIY Cupid Repellant [sic] Perfume, ‘beat the crap out of love’ piñata, enjoy an ice cream sundae bar, decorate your own cupcakes, and more!!” the event description exclaims.

    In addition to “beating the crap out of love,” the event also promised to help students created their own voodoo dolls, taking a different approach to dealing with the apparently stressed out and lovesick students.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @amber_athey



    Amber Athey

    Amber Athey

    Investigative Reporter

    Amber Athey is an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. She graduated from Georgetown University with a B.A. in Government and Economics, and is currently a member of the 2016-2017 Koch Associate Program. 

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