U Mich pharmacists take 'stand against collusion'

Anthony Gockowski
Investigative Reporter

  • The University of Michigan’s School of Pharmacy recently draped a banner in one of its on-campus buildings saying it stands “against collusion.”
  • The banner lists "terms of oppression," but the Dean of the school could not explain exactly why "collusion" was chosen for the non-exhaustive list.
  • The University of Michigan’s School of Pharmacy recently draped a banner in one of its on-campus buildings saying it stands “against collusion.”

    “I STAND AGAINST,” the top of the banner boldly proclaims, followed by a list of terms such as “racism, classism, sexism, bigotry,” and “white supremacy.” A disclaimer at the bottom, however, notes that "all terms of oppression are not listed."

    "I STAND AGAINST: racism, classism, sexism, bigotry, discrimination, white supremacy,...collusion..."   

    [RELATED: Trump supporters ‘not welcome,’ says diversity chair]

    A notable outlier among the “terms of oppression” is the word “collusion,” which unlike every other word on the list does not refer to some form of prejudice or discrimination.

    Campus Reform reached out to the School of Pharmacy for elaboration on its inclusion of the term, and Dean James Dalton explained that while he “wasn’t involved in the selection of the words,” he imagined “that ‘collusion’ was included amongst the other words signifying practices that exclude others based on unfair or biased measures.”

    He went on to express confusion at the genesis of Campus Reform’s “focus on the word collusion,” asking for “additional information.”

    [RELATED: University department calls Trump, Sessions ‘criminals’]

    Campus Reform elaborated that the word is mostly used to describe illegal cooperation between government officials, and was popularized most recently during allegations that the Trump campaign plotted with Russian diplomats.

    “The additional context is helpful. I think it is safe to say that the term can be applied in many contexts,” Dalton responded, citing “business, political, and academic integrity” as examples.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @AGockowski



    Anthony Gockowski

    Anthony Gockowski

    Investigative Reporter

    Anthony Gockowski is an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. He has previously worked for The Daily Caller, Intercollegiate Review, and The Catholic Spirit.

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