Campus Reform | LAWSUIT: UNM allegedly took donated remains of unborn baby for experiments

LAWSUIT: UNM allegedly took donated remains of unborn baby for experiments

A former patient at an Albuquerque abortion facility is suing abortion doctors for donating her unborn baby’s remains to the University of New Mexico for experiments.

The abortion clinic involved is being sued for negligence under New Mexico’s Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Experimentation Act, among other allegations.

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Nichole Atkins, a former patient at an Albuquerque abortion facility called Southwestern Women’s Options, is suing abortion doctors for allegedly donating her unborn baby’s remains to the University of New Mexico for experiments. 

 

The lawsuit, filed in June 2019, states that the abortion facility’s employees “knew or should have known” about the collaboration between the facility and the University of New Mexico. Nevertheless, the employees allegedly failed to tell Atkins how the unborn baby’s body parts would be used in the research.

 

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Southwestern Women’s Options’ three abortion doctors, Curtis Boyd, Shelly Sella, and Carmen Landau, gave Atkins a form “for the consent for treatment and an alleged consent to donate body parts” to Boyd. However, the form did not tell Atkins that Boyd was a volunteer faculty member at the University of New Mexico.

 The “custom and practice in the medical community is to provide a separate consent form for the donation of body parts,” explains the lawsuit, which is alleging that the three Southwestern Women’s Options employees engaged in negligence under New Mexico’s Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Experimentation Act.

 

The lawsuit also notes that the Congressional Select Panel on Infant Lives “has been investigating Southwestern Women’s Options and its relationship with the University of New Mexico.”

 

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Though the abortion clinic said in a 2016 that it “was the sole supplier of infant baby body parts” to the university, Atkins was never informed that this was the case. Furthermore, the clinic is being sued for “unfair or deceptive trade practice,” failure to provide proper informed consent, and medical malpractice.

 

Atkins told Campus Reform that her abortion left a profound negative impact on her life.

“It only takes one person, one voice, one mind to start a movement. I hope my story saves even one life from the lies and pain of abortion," Atkins said.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @BenZeisloft