Princeton to host 'fat positive dinner' for 'fat identified' students

Matthew Penza
New Jersey Senior Campus Correspondent

  • Princeton University's health center is putting on a "fat positive dinner" for students to discuss "fat positive programming for the spring semester."
  • Similarly, the university offered a course during the fall semester to help students fight "fat phobia" through dance.
  • Princeton University’s health center will soon host a “Fat Positive Dinner” for students who are “fat identified” to discuss their experiences.

    According to an online description for the February event, the dinner will be hosted by Health Promotion and Prevention Services (a division of the school’s University Health Services) in conjunction with the Women’s Center.

    “This space is intended for fat identified people to share their experiences as a fat person."   

    [RELATED: ‘Fat Studies’ course deems ‘weightism’ a ‘social justice issue’]

    “This space is intended for fat identified people to share their experiences as a fat person at Princeton in an accepting and supportive environment,” a newsletter put out by the Women’s Center states.

    Additionally, participants will “discuss fat positive programming ideas for the spring semester,” with the event description noting that “dinner will be served.”

    Meanwhile, the University Health Services website emphasizes the importance of “exercise and fitness” as an important part of a “healthy life.”

    [RELATED: Princeton course fights ‘fat phobia’ through dance]

    “Although Princeton students usually have very busy schedules, it is essential that you make time for exercise in order to lead a healthy life,” the website states.

    Sonya Satinsky, director of Health Promotion and Prevention Services, told Campus Reform that the "goal of the event is to have a conversation to discuss potential future programming focused on body size and body image." 

    "At this point, we are unsure whether it will be a one-time or recurring event, as this will depend on students' interest," she added, noting that "there is not specific funding allocated for this particular initiative." 

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @mpenza19





    Matthew Penza

    Matthew Penza

    New Jersey Senior Campus Correspondent

    Matthew Penza is a New Jersey Senior Campus Correspondent, and reports liberal bias and abuse on campus for Campus Reform. He is a junior at Princeton University, concentrating in the Department of Computer Science. He is currently a managing editor for The Princeton Tory, and is involved with the Aquinas Institute, the American Whig-Cliosophic Society, Princeton Pro-Life, and the Anscombe Society.

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