College hosts ‘lit for social justice retreat’ for high schoolers

Anthony Gockowski
Contributing Editor/Investigative Reporter

  • Kellogg Community College will soon host a “Lit for Social Justice” retreat for high schoolers interested in discussing topics of “power and privilege.”
  • In addition to activities related to “social segregation, power and privilege, identity, resistance, and more," participants will watch "The Hunger Games" and use the film as a "lens" to "critically examine social justice themes."
  • Kellogg Community College will soon host a “Lit for Social Justice” retreat for high schoolers interested in discussing topics of “power and privilege.”

    The retreat, taking its name from a popular slang word referring to something that is “turned up or popping,” will be open to any ninth- through twelfth-grader “interested in issues related to social justice.”

    "Participants will...learn how to take productive action in support of social justice initiatives."   

    [RELATED: Students ‘who value social justice’ offered privilege retreat]

    According to a description for the retreat, participants will begin by viewing the film “The Hunger Games,” which will be “used as a lens through which [they] will critically examine social justice themes in our own society” while learning “how to take productive action in support of social justice initiatives.”

    The retreat, which will be hosted by the school’s Center for Diversity and Innovation, will also offer “workshops, breakout sessions, and team-building activities” for high schoolers to discuss “social segregation, power and privilege, identity, resistance, and more.”

    Notably, registration for the two-day retreat only costs $40, but “includes meals, accommodations and a T-shirt,” with the school noting that “scholarships are available for those who need assistance.”

    [RELATED: University holds segregated retreats to build racial tolerance]

    The small community college first made national headlines when school officials arrested three conservative activists who were distributing pocket Constitutions on campus, saying such activity was disruptive to students.

    Campus Reform reached out to the college for additional information on the retreat, but did not receive a response in time for publication.

    Follow the author of this article on Twitter: @AGockowski





    Anthony Gockowski

    Anthony Gockowski

    Contributing Editor/Investigative Reporter

    Anthony Gockowski is the Contributing Editor and an Investigative Reporter for Campus Reform. He previously worked for The Daily Caller, Intercollegiate Review, The Catholic Spirit, and The College Fix.

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