Prof calls for more 'gender-fluid' books in preschools

Toni Airaksinen
New York Campus Correspondent

  • A professor from the University of Rhode Island published a recent article that argued for placing more books with "transgender or gender-fluid protagonists" in preschool libraries.
  • Such a practice, she explained, would allow transgender children to "feel understood, validated, and respected for who they are."
  • A University of Rhode Island professor recently argued that libraries should start carrying more books with “transgender or gender-fluid protagonists” for preschoolers.

    Susan Trostle Brand, a professor of early childhood education, suggested in an article published last week that school libraries should carry books with LGBTQ main characters to “provide active and enthusiastic support” for youth in those communities.

    “Transchildren see protagonists like themselves, and feel far less alone."   

    [RELATED: College to host ‘anti-bias’ workshop targeting toddlers]

    “By using carefully selected children’s literature…teachers can make a positive difference in the lives of individuals who are transgender and/or those who live in diverse families,” Brand wrote in her article for the Journal of Childhood Education.

    Without these books, transgender kids may face a higher “risk of depression” or “low self-esteem,” Brand argues, especially since the “curriculum in most schools does not reflect the wide range of individual uniqueness” in the LGBTQ community.

    Brand told Campus Reform that providing kids access to books such as My Princess Boy and When Kathy is Keith is crucial because it helps to counter the societal message that there is “something dreadfully wrong with being gay or transgender.”

    [RELATED: Preschools are ‘rife’ with ‘heteronormativity,’ prof claims]

    “Transchildren see protagonists like themselves, and feel far less alone. They feel understood, validated, and respected for who they are. They are freed to be themselves,” she explained, calling upon her colleagues to set positive examples for non-transgender students and they “will follow suit.”

    “Early experiences with diverse literature and positive role modeling make a tremendous difference for transgender, gay, and cisgender individuals, alike,” Brand remarked, adding that parents have a similar responsibility.

    “Parents and caregivers should introduce the topic when children are in preschool,” she concluded. “They ‘get it’ more than we might think.”

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    Toni Airaksinen

    Toni Airaksinen

    New York Campus Correspondent

    Toni Airaksinen is a New York Campus Correspondent, and reports liberal bias and abuse on college campuses for Campus Reform. She is a junior at Barnard College, and also contributes regularly to The College Fix, USA Today College, Red Alert Politics, and Quillette Magazine. She formerly held a post with the Columbia Spectator and has been featured on Fox News and on the Drudge Report.

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